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The Quiberon Peninsula Between a rugged coast and fine sandy beaches
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The Quiberon Peninsula

With a spectacular rugged coast to the west and beautiful sandy beaches to the east, the Quiberon Peninsula offers 14 km of varied landscapes. One of the most popular seaside resorts in Brittany, it is also the departure point for Belle-île, Houat and Hoëdic.

BETWEEN A RUGGED COAST AND FINE SANDY BEACHES

Facing west, this splendid, rugged coast extends for 8 kilometres from Château Turpault to Pointe du Percho. It offers jagged cliffs and arches hollowed out by the waves – even in calm weather, the waves crashing on the rocks is a thrilling show. Stop at Pointe de Beg-er-Goalennec. From here, the view of the ocean and Belle-Ile is amazing.

Beach or wilderness?

The Quiberon Peninsula is a tourist hotspot in Brittany with around 30 km of coastline. Known for its beautiful long beaches, it has so many facets to offer anyone who takes time to discover them. It’s not all about white sand, emerald green sea and brown rocks. There are numerous megalithic sites along the coast and, inland, picturesque villages to discover.

An active destination

There are many marine activities to enjoy in Quiberon: walks, sea fishing, sailing, sand yachting, sea kayaking, kite surfing, etc. The peninsula is one of the best surfing spots in Brittany. The Grande Randonnée hiking trail goes around the peninsula and offers a wonderful sight, and there are also bike routes throughout the peninsula.

Little streets or lovely boutiques?

Immerse yourself in the charm of Breton villages of days gone by. Situated a little back from the coast, the hamlets on the peninsula offer views worthy of postcards. In the narrow streets lined with white houses with blue shutters and blooming hydrangeas, times seems to stand still. The beautiful boutiques in Quiberon are very tempting too. Food lovers will be spoilt for choice with numerous good seafood and fish restaurants, crêpe restaurants and, of course, our specialities: niniches (lollipops), salidou (salted butter caramel), Quiberon biscuits, smoked fish and the famous tinned sardines.

Situated a little back from the coast, the hamlets on the peninsula offer views worthy of postcards

DID YOU KNOW?

Medieval dream

Although it isn’t open to visitors, the silhouette of Château Turpault is emblematic of the Quiberon Peninsula. Its towers and battlements must surely date from the Middle Ages? No, in fact it was built in 1904 on the whim of a rich manufacturer.

Official website of tourism in Brittany