© © Distillerie Warenghem
Whisky, liqueurs & Breton spirits Drinks with a distinctive Breton character

Whisky, liqueurs & Breton spirits

Yec’hed mat, your health! Get to know the Breton skills that have made these locally-made drinks world-famous. Honey, apples, buckwheat and salted caramel all find their way into these character spirits that can be enjoyed as aperitifs or digestifs. You can also discover how these drinks are made in Brittany’s distilleries.

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Breton whisky

You don’t have to visit Scotland to enjoy a good whisky. Brittany has answered the Celtic challenge by producing whiskies of outstanding quality. Top-notch ingredients, acknowledged skills, good rainfall conditions that provide a long maturing period, the choice of casks and aging: these are the secrets that create an outstanding Breton whisky.

Breton whiskies and their distilleries:

  • The first Breton whisky, created in 1998: Armorik whisky from the Warenghem distillery
  • Eddu whisky from the Distillerie des Menhirs: the only whisky in the world distilled exclusively from buckwheat
  • Kaerilis whisky benefits from the traditional skills and perfect weather conditions on Belle-Ile-en-Mer
  • Traditional whiskies from the Glann ar Mor distillery.

Pommeau de Bretagne AOC

This alcoholic aperitif (17% vol.), which has an Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée, is made from two-thirds unfermented apple juice and one-third cider brandy, aged in oak casks for at least 14 months. With its beautiful amber colour and floral scent, Pommeau should be enjoyed at a temperature of 8°C to 10°C as an aperitif or digestif. Every year 17 Breton producers make 220,000 bottles of Pommeau de Bretagne AOC using 75 varieties of apples.

Pommeau de Bretagne

 

Lambig or Fine de Bretagne

Lambig is a cider brandy with a high alcohol content (40% vol.) and is produced by distillation in a retort (the Breton word for ‘retort’ is ul lambig). Also known as Fine de Bretagne, it’s the Breton equivalent of the Calvados produced in Normandy. It must be aged in oak casks for at least two years to earn its AOC. This spirit has a fruity bouquet and a very smooth taste and should be drunk at room temperature. It is also used in cooking to flambé meats and seafood to add subtle flavours.

The big names in Fine de Bretagne:

  • Fine Bretagne AOC Gilles Leizour from the Warenghem distillery
  • Lambig Guy Le Lay from the Distillerie des Menhirs
  • Lambig from the Manoir de Kinkiz cider works

Chouchen or apple mead

This is one of the world’s oldest drinks and is part of Brittany’s Celtic heritage. Produced from fermented honey and better known as mead, the Breton version includes apple and is also called chemillard or chamillard in areas where Gallo is spoken. This 13% vol. spirit, with its golden colour, should be drunk cold as an aperitif or digestif.

The big names in Breton chouchen:

  • Chouchen Melmor, made using traditional methods and its organic version Héritage des druides (Legacy of the Druids) from the Warenghem distillery
  • Hydromelix, naturally flavoured with apple, Plougastel strawberries, salted caramel or spices, from the house of Fisselier

 


Other gourmet liqueurs

  • Fleur de caramel: this liqueur, flavoured with Guérande salted caramel, created in 1998 by the Maison Fisselier, is a real treat – for grown-ups only, of course.
  • Kremmig from the Kinkiz cider works: this cream, flavoured with Breton lambig, should be enjoyed over crushed ice or as a topping for pastries.

The abuse of alcohol is damaging to health. To be consumed in moderation.

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