© Alexandre Lamoureux
8 stunning views along the GR®34 A life-sized photo album

8 stunning views along the GR®34

The GR®34 long-distance footpath, also called the Custom Officer’s path (‘Sentier des Douaniers’), is an extraordinary route that takes in the whole of the Breton coastline. Whether you’re a dedicated hiker or just enjoy a nice walk, you’ll feast your eyes along this trail, which was recently voted France’s favourite long-distance footpath. It’s a chance to turn your lens towards magical, sea-sprayed landscapes that are worthy of any picture postcard.

The world’s end at the Pointe de Pen-Hir

Natural headlands, sheer cliffs, turquoise water: the Crozon Peninsula is an idyllic setting for any walker. From the Cap de la Chèvre you can enjoy a 180-degree view over the sea and the Bay of Douarnenez as far as the Pointe du Raz. Another unmissable viewpoint is the Pointe de Pen-Hir, which has a dramatic series of rocks below it known as the ‘Heap of Peas’. Time for some selfies!


View over the Bay of Morlaix from Tahiti Beach

As you walk along this stretch of the GR®34, France’s favourite footpath, you’ll come across a peaceful spot with a view over the Bay of Morlaix with its sprinkling of small islands. There’s also a loop that allows you to take in the attractions of the Carantec Peninsula, such as Callot Island, which can be reached at low tide. At the Pointe de Pen al Lann, if you stop for a while on Tahiti beach, you can get superb shots of the small island of Louët and the fortress known as the Château du Taureau, which seem so close you could almost touch them.


The Pointe Saint Mathieu viewed from the Pointe de Penzer

From the Pointe Saint Mathieu, there’s an outstanding circular walk which gives you a 180-degree view from the Isle of Ouessant (Ushant) to the Isle of Sein in fine weather. At twilight the view becomes even more magical. In this seascape, the colours of sea and sky seem to merge and blend as the lighthouse beam brings light and rhythm to the scene.


A magical glow from the Ploumanac’h lighthouse

This is the kind of light that dreams are made of. The aptly named Pink Granite Coast displays amazing  silhouettes of rocks with a beautiful coppery pink glow as they’re lit by the dying rays of the sun. Along the Ploumanac’h pathway, which looks out onto a string of islands and islets, it’s hard not to get your camera out every few seconds as the path twists and turns into sandy coves and the landscape takes on the character of an open-air art gallery.


The wild coast of Quiberon from Port Blanc Beach

Head for the wild coast of Quiberon (the ‘Côte Sauvage’)  for a bracing walk. It’s worth the walk along Port Blanc Beach to see the beautiful arc formed by the ocean, with a distant view of the Pointe du Percho and the outline of a former customs post. To complete this circular walk of 10 km, the small fishing port of Portivy is an ideal spot to enjoy the view of the sunset over the ocean.


View of Cap Fréhel from Croc bay

The cliffs of Cap Fréhel offer one of the finest views in Brittany. Throughout this walk along the Goëlo Coast as far as the medieval fortress of Fort La Latte, the Cap Fréhel is an unmissable landmark. When you reach the foot of the lighthouse, you can enjoy a panoramic view in fine weather stretching all the way from the Cotentin Peninsula and Jersey to Paimpol: breath-taking!



Above Portuais Beach to Cap d’Erquy

Cliffs and remote beaches, the scent of moorlands, the sound of waves and the call of seabirds: this place wakes up all your senses. In fine weather Cap d’Erquy can be seen in all its glory. Try a panoramic shot or zoom in on the heather and the many butterflies that flutter over the moorland. Take your pick.

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