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High tides in BrittanyThe best observation spots

High tides in Brittany

In Brittany, the sea recedes every day, and then comes back six hours later. It’s the changing of the tides… Depending on the coefficients, they can be small or big; above 100, it’s known as a high tide. From 6 to 9 October, 4 to 7 November and 4 to 6 December 2021, make sure you’re in the front row for the high tide show! Here is a selection of the best observation spots and events for all the family.

Grande marée à Saint-MaloGrande marée à Saint-MaloGrande marée à Saint-Malo© Yannick Le Gal

Fouesnant, Pointe de Mousterlin and Les Glénan

When the tide is low, go to Pointe de Mousterlin. To discover the wealth of this Natura 2000 zone, take advantage of the outings proposed by the tourist information office. If you are lucky enough to have a boat, sail across to Iles de Glénan. A large part of the seagrass beds will be uncovered and reveal eelgrass.
Safety precautions: Check the times of the tides. Go at low water, one hour before the tide goes fully out. Wear bright colours. Make sure you have a mobile phone on you. Inform your family/friends when you go fishing. A ruler is available at the Fouesnant tourist information office to measure the shellfish.

Fouesnant Tourist Information Office.


The dunes of Keremma, a 360° view

At Pointe de Pen An Theven, on one side you can see the Keremma dunes, and on the other the granite boulder field of Plouescat.
Safety precautions: The tip is 2 metres from the ground. The risk is not major, but be careful not to get too close when the waves arrive.

Plouescat Tourist Information Office


Ploubazlanec, view of the Bréhat archipelago

From the Croix des Veuves in the commune of Ploubazlanec, you can enjoy a panoramic view of the Bréhat archipelago and, to the right, of Ile Saint Riom which will be completely uncovered.
Safety precautions: The site is on a cliff, therefore beware of the wind and do not get too close to the edge.

Paimpol Tourist Information Office


Carantec, seafood collecting on Ile Callot

When the tide is low, head to Ile Callot to pick seafood from the sea bed. With a rake, a gardening claw, a fork or a spoon, you’ll find cockles, clams and periwinkles. Find out about good practices to avoid damaging this fragile environment.
Safety precautions: Check the times of the tides. Go at low water, one hour before the tide goes fully out. Wear bright colours. Make sure you have a mobile phone on you. Inform your family/friends when you go fishing. A ruler is available at the Carantec tourist information office to measure the shellfish.

Carantec Tourist Information Office

Responsible fishing


At the heart of the mussel beds and oyster farms of Saint-Cast-le-Guildo

At high tide, take advantage of the walks organised by the Saint-Cast-le-Guildo tourist information office to discover the mussel beds and oyster farms of Arguenon Bay. You can end your stroll with a tour of a mollusc company and oyster tasting! Meet at Plage des 4 Vaulx, with your boots.

Saint-Cast-le-Guildo Tourist Information Office


Saint-Malo at high tide

In Saint-Malo, the range of the tides is the largest in Brittany. To fully enjoy the show, go to the ramparts of Fort à la Reine opposite the Fort National.
Safety precautions: Observe the high tide from a distance, not too close to the edge, and do not lean over.

Saint-Malo Tourist Information Office

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